Of frankenfoods and golden rice
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Of frankenfoods and golden rice risks, rewards, and realities of genetically modified foods

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Published by Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts and Letters in Madison, Wis .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Agricultural biotechnology.,
  • Agricultural biotechnology -- Moral and ethical aspects.,
  • Food -- Biotechnology.,
  • Biotechnology industries.,
  • International trade.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementedited by Frederick H. Buttel and Robert M. Goodman.
SeriesTransactions,, v. 89, Transactions (Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts and Letters) ;, v. 89.
ContributionsButtel, Frederick H., Goodman, Robert M., Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts and Letters.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsS494.5.B563 O29 2001
The Physical Object
Paginationiii, 147 p. :
Number of Pages147
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL3647002M
LC Control Number2002485749
OCLC/WorldCa48861206

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Get this from a library! Of frankenfoods and golden rice: risks, rewards, and realities of genetically modified foods. [Frederick H Buttel; Robert M Goodman; Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts, and Letters. Fall Forum] -- What is the promise and what are the dangers of genetically modified foods? Like it or not, such foods are already in our lives. Page 12 ï~~12 THE MICHIGAN BOTANIST Vol. 41 BOOK REVIEW Of Frankenfoods and Golden Rice. Risks, Rewards, and Realities of Genetically Modified Foods. Buttel, Frederick H. And Robert M. Goodman, editors. Transactions of the Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts and Letters . High Casuistry and 'Frankenfoods' Retrieving a For example, in a article that attempts to analyze the potential impact of golden rice, Henry Sidgwick’s book, The Methods of Ethics, changed the focus of moral philosophers from practical dilemmas to abstract theories. Conference Title: Of Frankenfoods and Golden Rice: risks, rewards, and realities of genetically modified foods. Papers from the Fall Forum of the Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts and Letters, Madison, Wisconsin, USA, November

The first book to tell the shocking story of Golden Rice, a genetically modified grain that provides essential Vitamin A and can save lives in developing countries—if only they were allowed to grow ry white rice is nutrient poor; it consists of carbohydrates and little else. About one million people who subsist on rice become blind or die each year from vitamin A. Download full Golden Rice Book or read online anytime anywhere, Available in PDF, ePub and Kindle. Click Get Books and find your favorite books in the online library. Create free account to access unlimited books, fast download and ads free! We cannot guarantee that Golden Rice book is in the library. READ as many books as you like (Personal use). A type of GMO rice called golden rice has 60% of the vitamin A a child needs and therefore can help prevent a multitude of symptoms and long-term side effects of vitamin A deficiency. With the growing population of the world (the UN estimates it will be up two billion in the next ten years), these attributes could aid in preventing starvation. Advances in GMOs accelerated under the loose regulations. The first genetically engineered food hit the market in (the Flavr Savr tomato). Since then, sugar beets, potatoes, corn, squash, rice, soybeans, vegetable oils and animal feed have all been manipulated. In , American farmers planted more than million acres of GMO crops.

  Revision with unchanged content. From Frankenfoods to Golden Rice, several recent studies in the field of science communication explore media coverage of genetically engineered (GE) foods with a central focus on public awareness and understanding. What is golden rice? Rice that has been genetically modified in order to combat vitamin A deficiency. It has been engineered to produce large amounts of β carotene in their endosperm. β carotene is a precursor molecule for vitamin A which can then be synthesised inside the body.   Beyond Frankenfoods. Transgenic golden rice does not yet fill the bowls of hungry Asian children. But the possibility that it will is the bright hope of scientists and biotech companies beaten down by the consumer backlash against the rapid and largely covert introduction of genetically modified organisms into global food supplies.   From Frankenfoods to Golden Rice, several recent studies in the field of science communication explore media coverage of genetically engineered (GE) foods with a central focus on public awareness and understanding.